Using older Adobe CC apps could get you sued, Adobe warns

A few days ago, Adobe discontinued older versions of some Creative Cloud apps. The company is now sending emails to its customers warning them of potential legal actions. That is, if you continue using these apps – you risk getting sued for infringement by third parties.

Matt Roszak shared a copy of the email on Twitter, commenting that it’s time to cancel the subscription:

As I can conclude from the email, Adobe’s records show the users who still use the old apps, and they will get this warning. It reads that “you are no longer licensed to use [the old apps],” adding that, if you keep using them, “you may be at risk of potential claims of infringement by third parties.”

But to make things clear, it’s not Adobe who’s threatening to sue you. They have probably licensed tech from third-party companies in older versions of CC apps. Now, this license has expired, and those third-party companies might go after you if you keep using them. Something similar happened last year when Adobe removed a few versions of Adobe Premiere Pro due to Dolby licensing issues.

Still, I believe this isn’t much of a consolation. If you’re working on an older computer, the lawsuit warning won’t magically make it more powerful so it can support the latest CC apps. Many people still use the old versions precisely because their machines can’t run the newer ones.

Although they were discontinued for download, the older CC apps should continue to run just fine if you have downloaded and installed them earlier, as DIYP pointed out before. However, it seems that using them now carries the possibility of facing legal actions. I guess this warning email should make you think twice whether you’ll still use the old apps or upgrade to new ones. Or just switch to one of the alternatives.

Source: DIY Photography

Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp return after 2.5-hour outage

In this March 13, 2019, file photo Facebook, Messenger and Instagram apps are are displayed on an iPhone in New York. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane, File)

People around the world reported being unable to access Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp for more than two hours Sunday morning.

According to traffic-monitoring website DownDetector, the outage was first noticed at 6:28 a.m. EDT. Users started heading to other social media platforms to report issues accessing the services moments later as reports of outages filtered in from parts of North America, Europe, Asia and Africa.

The services appeared to start returning for some users around 9 a.m. EDT.

Source: CTV News

PayPal Malaysia to close operation centre by end of 2019, VSS begins April

PayPal Malaysia’s operation centre will be closing its doors by the end of the year, with a VSS (Voluntary Separation Scheme) process taking effect from April until August 2019.

According to an unidentified PayPal source reported on Amanz.my who first broke the news, the move was due to a reorganisation exercise of its business direction combined with an undetermined relocation of its operation centre.

“Our Operation Centre in Malaysia has done a remarkable job serving our customers since the site opened in 2011. However, this decision was made to align our investment in sites that are better equipped to support the future needs of our customers and our company,” the source said.

“Our priority now is to do everything we can to set up our employees for future success and we are fully committed to helping them as they transition to the next step in their careers. As well as offering comprehensive separation packages, we have built an on-site careers center to promote job opportunities and provide immediate assistance to employees.”

The same report added that those who have been using PayPal locally can continue to do so without interuption as the exercise only affects the staff members at its operation centre.

“This internal reorganisation does not affect our customers in Malaysia, who can continue to use our products and services as normal.”

Source: New Straits Times

TM Internet services down due to multiple fibre cut incidents

PETALING JAYA: Telekom Malaysia Berhad (TM) has announced that its Internet services have been down since Saturday (Nov 17) night due to multiple fibre cable cut incidents by third-party contractors in Sentul and Sabak Bernam.

In a statement late Sunday (Nov 18) night, it said that its services – unifi, Streamyx, unifi Mobile as well as wholesale services in Central, Northern, and Eastern regions, as well as Sabah and Sarawak, have been disrupted since 11pm on Saturday.

“We would like to update that service restoration activities are currently in progress and are expected to be completed at 6am on Monday (Nov19),” it said, apologising for any inconvenience caused by this disruption.

Customers can reach out to TM on their Twitter @helpmeunifi or message it on facebook.com/weareunifi for further clarification.

Source: The Star Online

Alibaba co-founder Jack Ma to retire

Jack Ma, founder of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba, gestures during the launch of Alibaba’s office in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia June 18, 2018. – Reuters

NEW YORK: Jack Ma, Alibaba Group Holding Ltd’s co-founder and executive chairman, is retiring from the company, the New York Times reported on Friday.

Ma was quoted as telling the paper he would step down on Sept. 10 to pursue philanthropy in education, the report said.

Alibaba was not available for comment outside business hours. – Reuters

Source: The Star Online

Bullet Message has reached 5 million users barely two weeks

Bullet Message has reached 5 million users barely two weeks after its Aug 20 debut. — Bloomberg

This upstart wants a slice of WeChat’s billion users

Call it David versus Goliath – with emojis.

China’s dominant social network, WeChat, faces an upstart competitor that’s not only found a growing numbers of users, but also funding from investors and support from techies.“

Bullet Message has reached 5 million users barely two weeks after its Aug 20 debut. While that’s a rounding error compared to Tencent Holding Ltd’s WeChat, which passed 1 billion users in March, interest in QuickAs Ltd’s month-old app was enough to rank Bullet above WeChat in Apple Store downloads as of Sept 4.

“A lot of my friends and I feel we’ve been kidnapped by WeChat for too long,” said Hu Yutong, a Tsinghua University student in Beijing who downloaded Bullet on the first day. “We are intrigued by this new service, despite there being flaws.”

WeChat has come to rule China’s smartphone world by becoming a one-stop platform with everything from group-video chatting to electronic payments and food delivery to a ride-hailing service. At the outset, Bullet is focusing on a few things it does well, including a voice-to-text option that its operator claims delivers real-time transcriptions in Mandarin with an accuracy rate of 97%.

QuickAs’s initial funding includes 150mil yuan (RM90.89mil) from Gaorong Capital, Chengwei Capital and smartphone maker Smartisan Technology Co. That’s a far cry from Shenzhen-based Tencent, which has a market capitalisation of US$394bil (RM1.63tril), and has long battled Alibaba Group Holding Ltd for the crown as China’s most-valuable company.

“Bullet Message isn’t posing any real threat to WeChat at this stage,” said Shawn Yang, executive director of Blue Lotus Capital Advisors, a financial consulting company. Still, there are some similarities between Bullet and WeChat in its early days, with the upstart focusing on services that spotlight improved technology, such as voice optimisation“ for transcription and translation.

Tencent has alienated some users by pushing too hard to monetize existing services that have gotten outdated, Yang said. WeChat Moments,“ where users post photos and comments about meals, styles and daily activities, have become less intriguing,“ he said.

That somewhat echoes what’s occurred in the US around Facebook Inc and upstart Snapchat Inc, with the former considered stale among some younger users.

Snapchat has about 200 million users worldwide and Facebook’s WhatsApp message service about 1.5 billion. But both are among the many platforms blocked by China’s Great Firewall – which means less competition for Bullet as well as WeChat.

QuickAs didn’t respond to emailed questions sent by Bloomberg. But co-founder Hao Xijie told Jiemian.com that he doesn’t consider Bullet a direct competitor to WeChat.

Perhaps – but Tencent has taken note. Bullet’s original newsfeed relied on the larger company’s service. But that link was soon taken down.

Bullet’s voice-to-transcription offering – developed by speech-recognition specialist Iflytek Co – is among the most-attractive features. It enables users with regional accents to instantly and fluently communicate in Mandarin without the button-pushing needed on WeChat. Although Mandarin is China’s official language, many of its 1.4 billion people speak regional dialects.

Not all Bullet functions are unique or cutting edge.

The platform has been criticised for the amount of available pornography. Others have expressed concerns over privacy terms and the security of user information, as Bullet allows anonymous participation on group chats.

“1st impression is that it’s full of porn and other stuff that’s blocked/too sensitive for WeChat,” Matthew Brennan at China Channel, a Shenzhen-based marketing agency, wrote in a Twitter message.

“Many social networking apps face similar issues, like Snapchat,” said Blue Lotus’ Yang, “Bullet Message may not be the best alternative, but there might be something similar coming out in the near future, which is what WeChat should be worried about.” – Bloomberg

Source: The Star Online